Phillip Island: a day tour from Melbourne

In Melbourne, Travel Guides
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When I was in Italy and my boyfriend and I were planning our adventure in Australia, I always tried to imagine the beautiful places that this country offers. I saw lots of pictures about Australia, and the views were wonderful, but in the reality they give you indescribable emotions that pictures can’t give.

Australia is an interesting country with a unique wildlife, white-sand beaches and a vast and varied landscape that deserves to be visited. For these reasons, we decided to plan our first trip and start from the magic state of Victoria. If you go to some agencies around Melbourne, you can choose among a big variety of day tours that are worthy to do. The best thing is to hire a car and start travelling around Australia but unfortunately, we don’t have this possibility so we decided to book a day tour and our first destination was Phillip Island. Phillip Island is an Australian island, situated in southeast of Melbourne. A bridge connects the mainland town San Remo with the island town Newhaven, and it is long 640m.

This tour consisted of pickup service, with a funny guide who gave us lots of information about the amazing scenery during our journey, a tasting of cheeses and wines and a cafè lunch. After a strong coffee, we were ready to start our trip.

Rhyll Trout & Bush Tucker Farm

Our guide Peter picked up us at 11.35 and after two hours and a little break, we arrived at our first stop: Rhyll Trout & Bush Tucker Farm. It is a family farm in which fishing instructors will teach you to catch trouts in a tree-lined lake and in an indoor Rainforest Pool. In this farm there is also the Bush Tucker Trail, rich of particular plants, edible fruits, berries, seeds and flowers. Our guide gave lots of information about the particular plants, and some of them had a very good smell. In this place you can taste home style meals of home made bush tucker products that we had the pleasure to eat.

Philip Island Winery

After a rich lunch, Philip Island Winery was our second stop. It is in a rural location and, with its small vineyard, they produce Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Merlot, Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon. In fact, we had the pleasure to taste 5 types of their wine and cheeses. You can enjoy the tranquility of the courtyard, the rural and the coastal view. I suggest this place. It is perfect if you want to relax and rest awhile.
Phillip Island Winery

Koala Centre Conservation

The Koala Centre Conservation was the third stop of this trip. Thanks to the two tree top boardwalks, we were ‘face to face’ with koalas. You can get the change to see these creatures in their natural habitat. Another beautiful area in this centre is the woodland walk, where it’s possible to see different species of Australian wildlife, like wallabies, possums and obviously koalas. I have never seen koalas before coming in Australia. I fell in love with them. They’re very funny and cute. They adopt strange positions that sometimes seem very uncomfortable. Koala is a marsupial mammal and it is related to the kangaroo and the wombat because they have pouches. They could live for 20 or more years. I was very shocked when Peter, our guide, told us that koalas sleep for up to 19 hours. They only sleep and eat Eucalyptus leaves. A very lazy but cute animal!

Koala Centre Conservation

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Cowes

Our fourth stop was Cowes, a touristic hub in Phillip Island, rich of shops, cafes, restaurants, where you can enjoy a relaxing walk along the seaside and eat a yummy ice cream. I like little villages like Cowes, because it overlooks the sea and this makes me free. You can take a break from the same routine and just relax, go to the beach and swim.

Cowes

The Nobbies

The Nobbies, located at Port Grant, was a spellbinding view and the perfect place to see seals on the rocks. It was our penultimate stop, before the Penguin Parade. Unfortunately, we didn’t see seals but the landscape was fabulous. Along the coastline, there is a boardwalk that allows visitors to enjoy the amazing view and to take lots of pictures. You can see the blue and wild water of the ocean that hits rocks, marine birds and Little Penguins. In fact, there are wooden boxes placed near the boardwalk in which you can see these little penguins that are waiting for their mothers or they are rest. Nobbies are 5 minutes far from the Penguin Parade and if you take the coastal route to go there, you can see little wallabies by the side of the road. Wallaby is a macropod smaller than kangaroo and it feeds on grass. They’re very nice and shy. In fact, they usually scoot away but we were very lucky and we took lots of photos.

The Nobbies

Penguin Parade

Finally, our last stop was the Penguin Parade, one of the most popular attractions in Australia. We were seating on the view platform, enjoying an hot drink, and ready to see the penguins on parade. Every night at sunset, lots of Little Penguins return after a day fishing into the sea. They normally cross the beach at sunset, because the darkness protects them against predators. They waddle up the beach to their homes in the sand dunes. Little Penguin is the smallest penguin in the world, only 33 cm tall. They are blue or blue-grey with the underside and throat white. The majority of them has the same male for life, only a little part may change their mate. They are very nice and I found very funny how they walk. Unfortunately, we mustn’t take any photos of the parade because flash could damage their sight and frighten or disorientate them. It was a brilliant experience.

Penguin Parade

I suggest visiting Phillip Island, because It is rich of attractions. Sometimes, people just need to make an escape from the chaotic city or their job, and take a break. Phillip Island gives the chance to do that and to have a close observation of Australian wildlife, with wallabies, penguins, seals, koalas and so on. It was a magic day and I was happy to do this tour.

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